Tag: CCOL Profile

In Profile of a Learner (Part 1), you experienced our redesign of the CCOL Profile. One update shows the achievements each learner completed and highlights in-progress activities for them to continue their aspirations. Another change allows the learner to save their interests to the CCOL Profile. Now fast forward three months, and the tech team has iterated and strengthened the learner’s experience based on those selected interests.

User Experience Research

Digital Youth Network has always maintained a strong product feedback with our users. Mentors, teachers, and students have helped shaped all of our products including iRemix and Chicago City of LearningWe invested some valuable time to understand how learners were using their new profile, and whether it matched up with our pre-launch research. Our assessments came in the form of tools like CrazyEgg and old fashioned f2f user observations.

F2F
Our first research technique for this particular feature consisted of unstructured observations.  These observations were designed to avoid impeding a learner’s workflow. The team wanted to see what the learner’s mental model was when they interacted with a new experience. (sorry about the technical jargon)

The primary outcome was quite positive with many learners successfully self registering to any of our programs and exploring thousands of activities. However, the question of ‘What now?’ or ‘What do I do next?’ did arise several times.

CrazyEgg

As a complimentary tool to our observation, we employed Crazy Egg. This UX tool allows us to see a heat map of what learners were doing when they returned to this page. Many of our call to actions were taken as expected. Learners updated their interests, continued their in-progress online challenges, and registered themselves to activities and badges.

Per CrazyEgg’s site: Crazy Egg is like a pair of x-ray glasses that lets you see exactly what people are doing on your website.

Crazy Egg Heat map of CCOL Profile Image

Crazy Egg Heat map of CCOL Profile

One area stood out: our learners hovered over their interests…quite often. We did not design the interests themselves to be interactive. But the evidence presented on the heat map combined with the user research feedback suggested an opportunity for a focused call to action. The action was to make the interest icons interactive by presenting 3 activities as options for what to do next.

How did we convert research into “impactful value” for our Learners?

In the screenshot below, the application presents three Top Picks based on the learner’s Game Designer interest. These picks will be a mixture of face to face and online activities. With this enhancement, the CCOL Profile allows learners to dive into activities based on the interest they want to pursue right now.

This engagement-based update creates a valuable feedback loop that encourages learners to update their interests when their interest in subjects or professions shift. And because those can change as often as their avatars, CCOL can present new and challenging activities for our Learners to explore.

Top Picks on CCOL Profile Image

Top Picks for Interests on CCOL Profile

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The Chicago City of Learning started with complex but connected objectives. These objectives included building a platform that enabled every youth organization in Chicago to add their programming, creating a framework for identifying and badging skills in those programs, and designing an exploration interface for parents and youth to find programs to fit their schedule, skills, and interests.

This alone would make two valuable apps.

But another beneficial need pushed to the forefront once these features meshed: Highlighting the learner’s activities and skills. Helping the learner explore their interests with pathways.

Appropriately, we built CCOL for the learner with community organizations as the primary opportunity broker. The tech team waited to iterate on the learner profile design. After so many ambitious organizations added over 17k programs and learners earned over 130k badges, the design team shifted focus to redesign the two year old user experience of the learner’s profile.

First requirement: Recommend activities based on their interestsMy_Profile

We had our work cut out for us. DYN Tech started simple. Get each student’s interest with a visual icon-based selection process. These interests came from our ground team that works with teens in the classroom and in afterschool programs.

The images had to convey more than just the simple label beneath it. They each had to capture our learner’s imagination and hopefully spark their interest.

We didn’t stop with three interests. By designing a low friction process, we hoped our learners would be charitable and provide roles that captured their future interests as well. Roles are notoriously difficult because teens don’t always know what they want to be…when they “grow up.”  However the process is quick enough that they can (and do) update it every time they change their mind. And just like that CCOL offers recommendations based on those selections.

What I Like / Want

Second requirement: Show the skills and dispositions young people have developed in and out of school.

Things I’ve completed. For our learners, we display badges they earned from our organization’s programs and our platform’s online challenges. As part of identifying their skills and dispositions, we show the learner programs or events they have attended. Now our users have a repository of things they have done or earned. The landscape of learning is evolving and digital badges will play a big role in the documentation of that learning.

What I’m Working On. Our profile’s true call to action is nudging the learner to continue working on their skills. If a learner bookmarks a challenge, we have a card to remind them when they come back. Same reminder for a started challenge. If our learner starts a self-paced challenge but leaves before they complete it, we’ll add that to the Working On section as well.

Our design increases the visibility of activities they want to do or started but didn’t finish. Finish these and our design shines light on your accomplishments which usually result in digital badges.

Big step yet this is only step 1. Part 2 – engaged recommendations.

 

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